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Grand Ducal Standards until 1918 (Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, Germany)

Grossherzogsstandarten

Last modified: 2011-06-13 by german editorial team
Keywords: saxe-weimar-eisenach | grand duke | banner of arms | lion: barry (red-white) | lion (black) | hen (black) | coat of arms: circular | stripes: 10 | crancelin | canton (blue) |
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Grand Ducal Standard c.1862-c.1878

Grossherzogstandarte

[Grand Ducal Standard c.1862-c.1878 (Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, Germany)] 2:3
Flag abolished before 1878
by Theo van der Zalm modified by Santiago Dotor

The standard of the Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar is in fact a banner of arms, rather in the British tradition. Note that the striped lion is not for Hesse but for Thuringia. The Hessian house started as a branch of that of Thuringia. However Hesse prospered while the counts of Thuringia died out in the male line and the Saxon house of Wettin (counts-palatine of Meissen) inherited Thuringia. The second lion is that of Meissen. Below are the county of Henneberg and the estates of Arnshaugk, Blankenhain and Tautenburg. Source: Steenbergen 1862.

Theo van der Zalm, 16 June 2001

From Ralf Hartemink's International Civic Arms website:

(...) The arms show in the first quarter the striped lion of Thuringia. Thuringia was ruled by the Dukes of Thuringia-Hesse until 1247 and since it has been part of Saxony and most rulers over (parts of) Saxony from the Wettin dynasty used the striped lion in their arms.

The second quarter shows the lion of the County of Meissen, also one of the original possessions of the Wettin dynasty.

The third quarter shows the arms of the County of Hennenberg combined with the arms of the Lordship of Arenshaugk. The County of Hennenberg is also one of the oldest possessions of the Wettin dynasty, but the arms of Arenshaugk stand for the Neustadt district, one of the additions to Saxe-Weimar in 1815.

The fourth quarter combines the lion of the Lordship of Blankenhain and the arms of the Lordship of Tautenburg. Both areas were part of Saxony until 1815.

The escutcheon shows the arms of Saxony proper.

The garter around the escutcheon is that of the Grand Ducal House's Order of Vigilance or Order of the White Falcon (Großherzoglich Sächsischer Hausorden der Wachsamkeit / Orden vom Weißen Falken). Its motto reads 'vigilando ascendimus'.

Santiago Dotor, 11 July 2002


Grand Ducal Standard c.1878-1897

Grossherzogstandarte

Siebmacher 1878 mentions that the grand duke uses the black-green-yellow Landesflagge with the lesser arms on the middle stripe.

Theo van der Zalm, 22 June 2001


Grand Ducal Standard 1897-1903

Grossherzogstandarte

[Grand Ducal Standard 1897-1903 (Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, Germany)] 1:1
Flag adopted 1897, abolished 1903
by Theo van der Zalm modified by Santiago Dotor

This standard and that of grand duchess Sophie have the order of stripes adopted as Landesflagge on 29th January 1897, so I guess it cannot have been used before that date.

Santiago Dotor, 25 June 2001

The garter around the Saxon arms is that of the Grand Ducal House's Order of Vigilance or Order of the White Falcon (Großherzoglich Sächsischer Hausorden der Wachsamkeit / Orden vom Weißen Falken). Its motto reads 'vigilando ascendimus'.

Santiago Dotor, 11 July 2002


Standard of the Grand Duchess Sophie, born Princess of the Netherlands, 1897-1903

Standarte der Grossherzogin Sophie, geboren Prinzessin der Niederlande

[Standard of the Grand Duchess Sophie 1897-1903 (Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, Germany)] 1:1
Flag adopted 1897
by Theo van der Zalm modified by Santiago Dotor


Grand Ducal Standard 1903-1918

Grossherzogstandarte

[Grand Ducal Standard 1903-1918 (Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, Germany)] 1:1
Flag adopted 1903, abolished 1918
by Theo van der Zalm, Alvan Fisher, Mark Sensen and Santiago Dotor

Like the royal standard of Saxony, but with canton containing arms of the Landgraviate of Thuringia (a red and white striped lion rampant on a blue field). In use until 1918.

Norman Martin, March 1998

The square Saxon banner-of-arms with Thuringian canton was adopted 1903, contemporarily to many other banner-of-arms-like German sovereigns' standards (cf. Württemberg, Hesse etc.), similarly simple yet beautiful.

Santiago Dotor, 10 July 2002